Fondos (y SICAV) de moda


#61

Copio y pego el análisis de M*

American Funds New Perspective has a Morningstar Analyst Rating of Gold for its ability to find promising companies whose markets extend beyond their home region.

The fund’s focus on multinational blue chips includes firms domiciled in emerging markets. Although the managers seek growth across the globe, they try to buy when it is mispriced or misunderstood, often hanging on through subsequent rough patches. For example, they built most of the fund’s now top-10 position in Samsung Electronics in early 2017 as the firm sought to address issues that led to its Galaxy Note 7 phones catching fire and to recover from a corruption scandal involving company leadership. The fund is now poised to benefit from Samsung’s development of wraparound screens for phones, tablets, and televisions.

The managers’ preference for tech stocks extends beyond Samsung. Since year-end 2012, the fund’s tech weighting has more than doubled to about a fourth of the portfolio. The fund’s high-single-digit semiconductor stake is now one of the world large-stock Morningstar Category’s biggest. Top-10 positions Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, ASML Holding ASML, and Broadcom AVGO each stand to profit from increasing demand for chips and components used in Internet-connected devices.

American’s multimanager system lets the fund’s seven named managers play to their strengths. Each manager oversees a separate sleeve of the portfolio in line with his or her own style. Meanwhile, the combination of sleeves mutes volatility for the fund as a whole and helps it to fare well in different market conditions.

Outperformance has been the norm. Although the fund struggled in 2016, placing near the category’s bottom quintile, it rebounded in 2017 and finished in the top half of the peer group in every other calendar year in the past decade. Since its 1973 inception and during longest-tenured manager Robert Lovelace’s 15-plus years, it has trounced its typical category rival and the MSCI All-Country World Index.

The fund is topnotch.

Process Pillar: Positive | Alec Lucas, Ph.D. 12/13/2017
The fund’s singular focus combined with its willingness to adapt merit a Positive Process Pillar rating. Since its March 1973 inception, the fund has sought to invest in firms poised to benefit from changing global trade patterns. While that mission has endured, the fund’s methods have evolved with the market. In its early days, the investable universe consisted largely of the constituents of the MSCI World Index, the fund’s longtime benchmark. As the global opportunity set broadened to include developing markets, the fund began investing there, too, and in October 2011 changed its benchmark to the MSCI All-Country World Index. The fund can now invest in firms located anywhere in the world if they receive at least 25% of their revenues from outside their home region and have at least a $3 billion market cap float at time of purchase. Although those requirements lend themselves to a continued emphasis on developed-markets blue chips, the fund’s emerging-markets stake has increased in recent years. As of September 2017, it was 11% of assets, a bit higher than the fund’s mid- to upper-single-digit historical norm.

American’s multimanager approach lets the managers play to their strengths. With distinct styles, they can invest in their best ideas or hold cash and wait for compelling opportunities. The combination of separately managed sleeves mutes the overall fund’s volatility. Only high portfolio turnover is frowned upon.

Sector and geographic allocations in the fund’s roughly 250-stock portfolio are largely a byproduct of its managers’ bottom-up analysis. The fund’s balance of domestic and foreign stocks also shifts based on where the managers see the best opportunities. Its helping of U.S. stocks has ranged from more than half to less than a fourth of assets during the past three decades and stood at 48.7% in October 2017, up from less than 30% near the U.S. market’s 2007 peak.

The fund’s managers seek growth across the globe but buy when it is mispriced or misunderstood, often hanging on through subsequent rough patches. For example, they built most of the fund’s now top-10 position in Samsung Electronics in early 2017 as the firm sought to address issues that led to its Galaxy Note 7 phones catching fire and to recover from a corruption scandal involving company leadership. The fund is now poised to benefit from Samsung’s development of wraparound screens for phones, tablets, and televisions.

Since year-end 2012, the fund’s tech weighting has more than doubled to about a fourth of the portfolio. The fund’s high-single-digit semiconductor stake is now one of the world large-stock category’s biggest. Top-10 positions Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, ASML Holding ASML, and Broadcom AVGO each stand to profit from increasing demand for chips and components used in Internet-connected devices.

Performance Pillar: Positive | Alec Lucas, Ph.D. 12/13/2017
Consistent outperformance earns the fund a Positive Performance Pillar rating. Its trailing returns for the three- to 15-year periods through November 2017 all rank in the world-stock category’s top quintile or better. Although the fund struggled in 2016, placing near the category’s bottom quintile, it has finished in the top half of the peer group in every other calendar year in the past decade. Since its 1973 inception and during longest-tenured manager Robert Lovelace’s 15-plus years, it has trounced its typical category rival, the MSCI All-Country World Index, and its former benchmark, the MSCI World Index.

The fund has amassed this record without incurring more volatility than its average peer or index. In fact, its Morningstar Risk rating for the trailing 10-year period through November 2017 is below average. It also has captured nearly 105% of the MSCI All-Country World Index’s upside and 93% of its downside since Lovelace joined the fund in December 2000.

The fund’s focus on multinational blue chips has seldom hurt shareholders. In its 40-plus calendar years, the fund has lost money in only seven (1974, 1990, 2000-02, 2008, 2011). In each of those years the fund lost significantly less than the benchmark, except for 2011. Even then, the fund held its own during 2011’s peak-to-trough plunge but lagged in the subsequent rebound and lost 7.6% for the year, versus the index’s 5.5% drop.

People Pillar: Positive | Alec Lucas, Ph.D. 12/13/2017
American Funds’ multimanager approach helps to handle this fund’s $76 billion asset base, the world-stock category’s second largest. The fund’s Positive People rating reflects its systemic strengths as well as the managers’ experience, ability, and aligned interests.

Capital Group, the parent of American Funds, divides these assets between management teams from subsidiaries Capital World Investors and Capital International Investors. Joanna Jonsson oversees CWI’s team of Jonathan Knowles, Brady Enright, and Isabelle de Wismes. Longest-tenured manager Robert Lovelace heads up CII’s team, which includes Noriko Chen and Steven Watson, who had been a CWI manager here prior to October 2015. Each of the managers, based in the United States, England, and Asia, oversees a separate sleeve of the portfolio, with Jonsson and Lovelace helping to ensure that their investing styles complement one another. For example, Knowles runs a very top-heavy portfolio of about 30 stocks with high returns on equity, while Watson sticks largely to value names in a more diffuse portfolio of 50-60 stocks. They’re a veteran group. Each manager has been in the industry for at least 25 years. The CWI and CII teams are both supported by about 40 analysts, with each analyst group also responsible for its own slice of the portfolio.

Each manager has at least $100,000 in the fund, with five investing more than $1 million.

Parent Pillar: Positive | Alec Lucas, Ph.D. 02/28/2018
As a standard-bearer in asset management, Capital Group earns a Positive Parent rating. Widely known in the U.S. for its American Funds open-end lineup, the active manager boasts some of the industry’s more reliable equity and allocation offerings. The firm’s multimanager system is key to its success. Dividing each fund into independently run sleeves lets managers invest in line with their styles, enhancing diversification and reducing the overall portfolio’s volatility. The funds’ analyst-led research portfolios help develop the next generation and recruit top talent with the promise of running money from the start. The result is an investment culture marked by lengthy tenures, strong manager fund ownership, and competitive long-term records.

Capital Group has improved its fixed-income approach through greater coordination, external hires, and enhanced risk management. The firm now has the tools to compete with best-in-class fixed-income shops, though its investment professionals could become more seasoned in their use.

Investors have shown renewed interest in American Funds amid the firm’s efforts to expand in Europe, Australia, and Asia. The potential for these investors to pour money into the same strategies should incline Capital Group to clarify what would cause it to close a strategy to protect current shareholders, something the firm has said it would be willing to do.

Price Pillar: Positive | Alec Lucas, Ph.D. 12/13/2017
This fund is one of the cheapest broker-sold options in its category, and it looks affordable compared with no-load funds, too. The A shares’ 0.75% expense ratio, which applies to more than half of the fund’s assets, is 50 basis points below the world-stock, front-load peer median and cheaper than 99% of those peers. It would also place in the cheapest quintile of the category’s no-load options. Plus, 12 of the fund’s 16 other share classes (together accounting for nearly all the remaining assets) sport bottom-quintile expense ratios versus similarly distributed rivals.

Trading costs across all share classes were also comparatively modest. Brokerage fees of 0.03% of average net assets in fiscal 2017 were below the 0.06% category median.


#62

Morningstar dice que el tamaño del fondo es $82B, por lo que añadiendo cuentas separadas y otras movidas nos podemos ir fácil a más de $100B. Con un tamaño tan grande, tienes que diversificar más de lo necesario (tiene 241 empresas en cartera) y no te puedes mover tanto como te gustaría y si lo haces generas costes de transacción (tiene una nada despreciable rotación del 28%).

Por otro lado, el nivel elevado de valoración general de los mercados a día de hoy hace que la comisión de gestión (en Europa 1.65% creo) sea un porcentaje alto con respecto a al retorno esperado a estos precios. Si suponemos una rentabilidad futura del 5% (FCFF/EV=3% más 2% GDP a largo plazo), el fondo lo tendría que hacer un 33% mejor que el mercado para sólo empatar con él. Con un 6%, el 27.5%.

Por las dos razones anteriores creo que es bastante improbable que el Capital Group se separe mucho del retorno de un índice equivalente. Necesitaría un feedback loop burbujil al estilo dotcom en una parte del mercado ( y no caer en él) para poder diferenciarse por su trabajo.

Lo dicho, de una manera u otra, aplica al 99% de fondos de inversión.

Como le gusta decir a @Witten, caveat emptor :grinning:

Un saludo


#63

Respondiendo a las dos preguntas:
BNP
Porque lo que yo haga o deje de hacer no tiene la menor importancia para los demás, es incidental.


#64

Admitamos que tu análisis es correcto (discutible, ya que, por esa regla de tres, no convendría invertir en bolsa en absoluto, porque nunca se van a superar significativamente los precios actuales). Si esto es así yo ya puedo esperar superar al índice en un nada despreciable 0,8 % anual, ya que llevo la clase Z.

Veamos en cualquier caso qué ha hecho en el pasado:

Y efectivamente, caveat emptor. Esto no es recomendación de ninguna especie. Solo un comentario.


#65

No ha entendido el argumento. Me refería a ver la comisión de gestión como porcentaje del retorno anual esperado. No he insinuado en ningún momento que el retorno de la renta variable vaya a ser negativo a largo plazo, he dicho que lo más probable es que sea bajo dadas las valoraciones actuales. Si el retorno anual esperado es bajo, la comisión de gestión es alta comparada con él. Tanto más, obviamente, cuanto menor sea el retorno y mayor sea la comisión. Lo que obliga al fondo a tener resultados brutos sustancialmente mejores que el mercado. Tanto mejores, otra vez, cuanto menor sea el retorno esperado y mayor sea la comisión. Empresa bastante difícil cuando se tiene en cuenta el tamaño del fondo. Por supuesto, una comisión de sólo 0.82% alivia el handicap.

Un saludo


#66

Aunque no tan popular en este foro desde luego que el Santander Small Caps España está o a estado muy de moda.
1300 millones en small & mid españolas, que peligro


#67

Y si la moda se refiere a numero partícipes y patrimonio los mixtos conservadores/moderados de BBVA, SAN, Caixa, Bkia … Son 9 de los 10 mayores fondos de España (y el otro un monetario)


A 5 años ninguno de los 10 pasa del 2.5% anual y 2 de esos fondos en negativo


#68

Me había olvidado de los Templeton Global Bond y Global Total Return, muy populares en 2009-2011, el 1º en negativo a 5 años, el 2º 0 a 5 años (clase divisa cubierta)


#69

Como ya no son tan populares como en 2009-2012, amplio información sobre esos fondos RF de Templeton

Las versiones divisa cubierta € de ambos rondan el 0% a CINCO años (y un 0% en RF a 5 años es muy flojo), las clases “baratas” A-H1 rondan el +0.algo anual y las clases caras N-H1 el -0.algo anual a 5 años. Claro que en las clases caras pagar un TER del 2.1% en un fondo RF es caro, caro, y en las baratas el TER 1.4% tampoco es tan barato en RF.

Las clases sin cubrir divisas les fue mejor debido a que ha habido más caídas del euro que subidas (auqnue la leche en 2017 fue maja)


#70

@Manolok

Fantástico hilo.

Echo de menos el Banif Inmobiliario

image

En su momentó fue el no va más y acabó como el rosario de la aurora.


#71

Cierto, o el otro fondo inmobiliario con corralito: Segurfondo Inversión de Inverseguros, pero era menos popular
Precisamente fui participe del Santander Banif Inmobiliario, es en parte responsable de que me pusiera a aprender


#72

Se conoce cual es la intrahistoria de ese underperformance?

Porque así, a simple vista me parece que el fondo no estaba bien categorizado. Sino es imposible que cayera de ese modo ( o que pillará algún papel que hiciera “sinpa”)


#73

Tenia papeles de Lehman, Fanni Mae y demás colección de MBS yankees.


#74

Puede darse una vuelta por mucho fondo español de renta fija corto plazo con bonos de toda clase, en principio con prima adicional por asumir lo que parece un riesgo ligero, que ya sabemos como puede terminar en el caso de materializarse ese riesgo tan improbable pero que de vez en cuando pasa.

Un caso ejemplo, aunque no deja de ser un ejemplo de fondo mal categorizado, con las limitaciones que suelen tener las categorías de Morningstar, es el Renta 4 Renta Fija corto plazo.

Con un gráfico como el que sigue
Sin%20t%C3%ADtulo
debería parecer lógico que el fondo asume bastante más riesgo que lo que indica la categoría donde está y el tipo de bonos divergirá bastante de lo habitual de la categoría.

Sin%20t%C3%ADtulo

Este suele ser un problema típico de “abusar” de los filtros de datos para buscar fondos, que al final uno se va a fondos que no son realmente de la categoría o logran sus resultados a base de incrementar claramente el riesgo, al menos el riesgo de caídas superiores si se complica el mercado.


#75

Es que hay fondos “RF diversificada” que deberían aparecer como “High Yield”. y no digo sea malo, siempre que el participe sea consciente


#76

Completamente de acuerdo con @agenjordi.

La solución aquí radica en revisar la composición exacta de los holdings que se integran en la cartera.

Para los fondos españoles es mucho más fácil porque además de la información contenida en la ficha de la gestora, se puede consultar en la información depositada en CNMV.

Se lo digo porque por curiosidad me he puesto a ver qué había en carretera dentro de ese renta fija corto plazo de Renta 4 y aunque sea una posición testimonial hay un bono convencimiento en 2049. que debe ser corto plazo si te llama Matusalén porque si no ya me dirán ustedes…

http://www.morningstar.es/es/fundquickrankLegacy/default.aspx?search=corto%20plazo

Infinitas categorías… (con/sin exposición a dolar)…


Que tienen fondos con bonos A y duraciones de 0,9…

…a fondos con duración menor a 0,5 con rating BB (y por tanto dentro del tramo HY que indicaba @Manolok

Lo más frustrante… que de 70 clases de fondos, sólo 9 clases ( de cuatro fondos diferentes) tienen información de su cartera.

La solución larga —> Empollarte lo que hay dentro.

La solución corta—> ¿Invierte el gestor en su fondo?. Si la respuesta es sí… entonces ya empiezas con la solución larga. (En mi caso pocos fondos que no pasan ese filtro siguen al siguiente paso)

Pero lo que está claro es que el minorista lo tiene complicado para entender en que está invirtiendo. Y tampoco veo una solución mejor en cuanto a las categorías. Al final muchas de ellas se definen por exposiciones medidas en intervalos… y si tienes en cuenta:

-. Exposiciones a divisa
-.Exposiciones a duración
-.Uso de coberturas de divisa
-. Exposición o límite de bonos de un determinado rating

… puede acabar saliendo una matriz N-dimensional que acaba añadiendo más complejidad que simplifica el asunto.

Al final como todo…leer leer y leer.